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Global presence of Diabetes mellitus now epidemic, human clinical studies show Fulvic acids offer significant help

Diabetes mellitus responsible for enormous world economic burden

A December supplement to the British Diabetic Association journal, Diabetic Medicine, warned that the prevalence of diabetes worldwide is expected to nearly double in the next twelve years. Dr. Paul Zimmet and colleagues for the International Diabetes Institute and the World Health Organization report that diabetes mellitus "appears to be epidemic in many regions of the world" and will double and could even triple by the year 2010.

With fulvic acid, diabetes patients became more energetic and the tingling, painful feeling and numbness experienced in the nerve endings disappeared or were reduced.

Yuan, Shenyuan; et al; Application of Fulvic acid and its derivatives in the fields of agriculture and medicine; First Edition: June 1993

Related reports were quoted as saying that "The corresponding burden of complications and premature mortality resulting from diabetes will constitute a major public health problem for most countries." Dr. George Alberti, Vice Chair of the British Diabetic Association says, "In the short term, it is vital that attempts to change lifestyles are stepped up and that investment in finding a cure is increased. In the longer term, it is equally important that we ensure that we have the medical infrastructure in place to deal with the problem."

Scientists found that fulvic acids show significant success in preventing and combating free radical damage to pancratic islet B cells, which is the widely accepted cause for diabetes mellitus. What they discovered was that the Fulvic acid preparation significantly increases superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Their clinical studies show that fulvic acids diminish the development and progression of diabetes, and assisted in the treatment.

Bhattacharya, S.K. Activity of shilajit on alloxan-induced hyperglycemia in rats. Fitoterapia, Volume LXVI, No 4, 1995, pg. 328.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recently concluded that "The economic burden of diabetes mellitus in the US is enormous." In their February 1998 issue of Diabetes Care, the ADA estimated that total direct and indirect costs reached $98 billion in 1997, which is now about 8% of all healthcare costs. The ADA wrote in their report that the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes in the US is now about 3% of the population. This relates to $10,071 per capita in medical expenses for diabetics compared with $2,669 for non-diabetics. According to Dr. Richard Kahn and the Alexandria, Virginia, based ADA, any advances that can "delay the onset or slow the progression of diabetes" are needed to "mitigate the associated clinical and cost repercussions."

Diabetes mellitus stems from dietary deficiency of protective humic substances, especially fulvic acids

Most medical doctors and diabetes associations do not know that scientists in less conspicuous parts of the world are making significant inroads into the treatment and prevention of diabetes mellitus with fulvic acid humic extracts and herbs. In fact, Fulvica BioScience's studies have identified a missing dietary link as likely a major cause for the disease. However, the valuable research may be entirely overlooked because the solution does not necessarily have the huge profit potential that is standard to the pharmaceutical industry.

For centuries people living in isolated villages in the Himalayas and adjoining regions have used preparations made from a rare fulvic acid containing humic substance known as Shilajit, to prevent and combat problems with diabetes. Diabetes is quite uncommon in the isolated mountain villages, yet a brisk trade in these rare fulvic acid containing preparations has expanded in recent years to the traditional doctors in surrounding regions.

Due to the historical and recent expanding success of the diabetes treatments in the Himalayan region, medical researchers have taken a more serious interest in determining if the claims have scientific merit. Dr. Salil K. Bhattacharya and scientists from the Neuropharmacology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medial Sciences, at Banaras Hindu University in India, undertook extensive clinical studies on the subject. What they proved was that it was the fulvic acid fraction in Shilajit, and other closely associated humic compounds, that were responsible for the anti-diabetic activity and long reputed historical success of that preparation.

Dr. Bhattacharya recognized that the fulvic acids showed significant success in preventing and combating free radical damage to pancratic islet B cells, which is the widely accepted cause for diabetes mellitus. What he discovered was that the fulvic acid significantly increases superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Dr. Bhattacharya’s clinical studies showed that fulvic acids diminished the development and progression of diabetes, and assisted in the treatment.

Studies going on in other countries confirm the work of Dr. Bhattacharya regarding fulvic acid SOD activity and effectiveness of diabetes. Studies in China take the research even further.

Extensive human clinical studies carried out in various medical schools and hospitals in China have shown significant success in treatment of diabetes patients. Studies show that patients become more energetic. The tingling, painful feeling and numbness experienced in the nerve endings disappear or are reduced. In China, the pharmaceutical use of fulvic acids have now been approved for both internal and external use, because they have shown that they are both safe and effective.

References:

Diabet Med 1997;14:S7-S85.

Diabetes Care 1998;21:296-309.

Yuan, Shenyuan; et al; Application of Fulvic acid and its derivatives in the fields of agriculture and medicine; First Edition: June 1993

Tiwari, V.P., Tiwari, K.C., Joshi, P. J. Res. Indian Med. 8, 53 (1973)

Bhattacharya, S.K. Activity of shilajit on alloxan-induced hyperglycemia in rats. Fitoterapia, Volume LXVI, No 4, 1995, pg. 328.

Halliwell, B., Gutteridge, J.M.C., in "Free Radicals in Biology and Medicine", 2nd Ed., Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1989, p. 310.

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